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The Political Class

I don't usually connect to Iain Dale, but I did find his interview with Peter Oborne extremely interesting.

The emergence of a political class is something that has left me profoundly uneasy.

Thomas Sowell's book, The Vision of the Anointed also, albeit from an explicitly right wing American point of view, evaluates the political effect of the clannishness of "liberal" politics- with the subsequent advent of American neo-conservatism, it seems appropriate to apply his strictures across the political spectrum.

I will write further on this, but watching Peter Oborne was a breath of fresh air.

Constitutional reform is an urgent issue, not a theoretical one.

Comments

Anonymous said…
I share your concern Cicero. But and allow me a shade partisanship here your Party pioneered this. CK is a great chap but an MP since he was 23 how much can he understand the real world. Not quite as extreme but JG an MP at 25 not quite enough time to meet the ordinary Joe before entering the Westminster Club surely


Lepidus
Cicero said…
I can not really say that this is a matter of party interest- indeed most of our MPs were NOT kid politicians: Cable was chief economist at Shell, Huhne founder of Fitch IBCA, Campbell a successful QC, Ashdown a soldier and diplomat, Bruce a journalist and publisher and so on.

I think the shocking thing in the Oborne interview, which I had heard before, but not so starkly was that no one in the cabinet has worked in business or management at all.

It should worry all of us that both Labour and Conservative, and to a lesser extent Lib Dems have all become professional politicians.
Tristan said…
I've had those worries for a long time.
I look at so many politicians and they've just been in politics ever since university (or before) without any experience outside.

Unfortunately I don't know how to solve this problem...

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